CSA Newsletter 2008

Garden CSA 2008                                                                          Week 17
By popular demand!!!(and because it was in a much earlier newsletter that I don’t have on this computer) The BEET recipe

 

Sauteed Grated Beets:  from Serving up the Harvest by Andrea Chesman (Storey Publishing)

 

Ingredients:
4-5 medium beets, peeled and grated

3 Tbsp butter

1-2 Tbsp fresh lemon or orange juice, plus a little more to taste

Salt and Freshly ground pepper

Directions:

Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the beets and stir to coat with the butter. Add 1 Tbsp of the juice, cover and simmer over low heat, stirring occasionally. Add another Tbsp of juice if the beets are sticking to the bottom of the pan. Cook until tender but not mushy, 7-10 minutes. Remove the cover and season to taste with salt and pepper and additional juice. Serve hot.

Garden CSA 2008                                                                          Week 10


Please watch your step in the flower patch- some of our lovelies have gotten really big and we need to get the hedge clippers out- so when you are out there picking the Cosmos or Torch please be careful of the CARROTS! They’ve been getting a little trampled and if we want to have carrots in the near future that can’t happen.

The end of the week is the 15th and, if you haven’t paid in full yet, your last installment is due. Let Des know if you aren’t sure if you’re paid up. Thank you!

  What’s in your share (maybe)

Swiss Chard

Cabbage

Summer Squash & Zucchini

Beets

New Potatoes

Cucumbers

Kale

Scallions

 Pick Your Own: Check out the MAP!

Flowers, Herbs-Summer Savory, Sage, Marjoram, Thyme & Basils-Lemon, Sweet, Purple & Thai– pick the tips, Parsley is coming along, but may still be too small.

Green beans- please let us help guide you as they are very floppy and remember that the amount allotted is what you will use in a week- this is not for canning, thank you.

Cherry tomatoes- light picking, only this week. All this rain makes for slow ripening in the tomato patch.

 Farm news:

Wild Blueberries- We’re trying again- the rain has put off harvesting and so we’ve been bumped to Wednesday late pm pick-up again. Supposedly it isn’t supposed to rain that day, so barring mold and rot from the weather we’ll have wild blueberries from the Benson Place in Heath on Thursday. If you reserved some, you may wait to pick them up until your regular pick-up day, or, if you would like them fresher, you can come by the farm on either Thursday or Saturday.

Vegetable of the Week: Green Beans

So by now, most of you have had a chance to sample our delicious green bean offering. We have three varieties out there- Provider (green), Jade (darker green) and Purple Wax. They all have slightly different tastes and textures. The first planting will soon be over and we will be into the second round. While beans are delicious raw, steamed, roasted or sautéed we thought that we would share a nice recipe we discovered that really brings out the flavor of these beans. We highly recommend roasting the beans in the oven- if you haven’t tried them this way, please do. You won’t ever want to boil them again. They don’t look as pretty, but they are incredible. Toss them with a little olive oil and sprinkle with salt and fresh ground pepper and lay out on a baking sheet. Roast for a few minutes until they are tender and wrinkled. Serve hot and make more than you think you will need since once you start eating them you are going to want more.

Recipe of the Week: Pan-roasted Green Beans with Warm Soy Viniagrette

Recipe courtesy of Serve Up the Harvest by Andrea Chesman

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp soy sauce

1 Tbsp Chinese rice wine or dry sherry

1 Tbsp rice vinegar

1tsp dark sesame oil

Fresh ground pepper

1 Tbsp peanut or canola oil

1 pound green beans

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 tsp fresh ginger, minced

1 Tbsp sesame seeds

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Place a serving platter in the over to keep warm.

To make vinaigrette, whisk together the soy sauce, rice wine, vinegar, sesame oil and pepper to taste in a small bowl.

Heat a large cast iron skillet over high heat. Add the canola oil and swirl to coat the pan, and continue heating until shimmering, about 30 seconds. Add about 1/3 green beans in a single layer to the skillet and cook until tender, turning occasionally with tongs or spatula, 4-7 minutes, depending on thickness and how tender you want them. Transfer the beans to the platter in oven to keep warm. Continue cooking the beans in batches until all are cooked. Return the skillet to the stove and reduce heat to med. Add the garlic and ginger and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the vinaigrette and heat for another 30 seconds. Pour the warm vinaigrette over the bens and sprinkle with sesame seeds, serve immediately.

 

 

Garden CSA 2008                                                                          Week 9

 

John and Peg are away on their annual family vacation for the next two weeks, so it is Des, Bobby and Kristen (with the help of AWESOME volunteers) who are holding down the fort. Anyone who has some extra time to help with morning harvesting on Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays for the next couple of weeks would be greatly appreciated. Talk to Des or just come on by in the early am, we’ll be in one of the fields or at the wash station behind the sugarhouse/distribution area.
We are narrowing in on the Buyer’s Club deadline for sign-up- if you are interested, please let us know and get us your $25/membership to cover the cost of catalogs.  If you have any other questions before committing contact Des or Kristen. 

  What’s in your share (maybe)

Head Lettuce

Swiss Chard

Cabbage

Summer Squash & Zucchini

Beets

New Potatoes

Cucumbers

Mesclun

Pick Your Own: Check out the MAP!

Flowers, Herbs-Summer Savory, Sage & Basil-Lemon, Sweet & Purple– pick the tips

*Anise Hyssop* in the flower row- they have purple spikes and a licorice scented leaves. They make beautiful cut flowers but their leaves also make a delicious licorice tea. Herbaceous effects- similar to other hyssops- good for coughs and sore throats.

Green beans- please let us help guide you as they are very floppy and remember that the amount allotted is what you will use in a week- this is not for canning, thank you.

Cherry tomatoes are getting close! By next week there will be enough to turn everyone loose in the patch.

Farm news: Smoked Pork is IN!

The bacon and ham has arrived. It goes really quickly-the bacon is farm-style thick cut and they raised the price on us for the smoking (we send all of our smoked meats to CT for a real wood smoking), so we had to raise our prices a little to compensate. Hams are ‘1/2′ hams so they are not huge. We had one for Christmas dinner last year and it was amazing. We only have a limited number so if you want one, get them now.

Sausages are quickly selling out. We still have breakfast, but both the Italians are running low. We are on the wait list to harvest two more hogs, at which point we will get in a lot more sausage since we know how much you love them.

Wild Blueberries– Organically grown wild blueberries from the Benson Place in Heath will be arriving on Thursday. If you reserved some, you may wait to pick them up until your regular pick-up day, or, if you would like them fresher, you can come by the farm on either Thursday or Saturday.

Recipe of the Week: Blueberry-Zucchini  Spice Muffins

These are delicious, soft, moist and beautiful. They are a sure kid pleaser and also they love to help!

Ingredients:

2 cups flour

½ cup sugar

¼ cup crystallized ginger, chopped (opt.)

1 Tbsp baking powder

1 tsp salt

1 tsp ground ginger

1 tsp cinnamon

2 tsp finely grated lemon/orange zest

2 large eggs

1/3 cup vegetable oil

½ cup milk or soymilk

1 tsp vanilla

1 ¼ cup zucchini, finely grated

½- ¾  cup blueberries (we’ve used both the large and wild with great success)

Other optional additions:

½ cup chopped pecans/walnuts

1/3 cup wheat germ for same amount of flour

Cinnamon-sugar for dusting the tops

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375. Grease muffin pan

Combine dry ingredients and whisk well in a large bowl or stand alone mixer. In a medium bowl, whisk wet ingredients and add in zucchini and stir well. Make a well in dry ingredients and add liquid plus any optional ingredients. Stir until just mixed. Spoon batter into cups until nearly reaching the top (if using large blueberries you will fill all 12 cups, if using wild, you may only fill 10). Bake until tops are golden brown 20-23 minutes.

Garden CSA 2008                                                                          Week 8

We’re trying to stay on top of the weeds out there, but it is a little difficult- all this rain in the last week has been incredible for growth of the plants and the weeds just won’t die. So don’t be surprised if you see them in some of the fields looking like they are going to take over.

Thank you to Kristen Laney and Cheryl Rose who are coordinating the effort to get the Buyer’s Club all organized. Please sign up on the sheet provided if you are interested in knowing more about the Club.

 

 What’s in your share (maybe)

Head Lettuce

Swiss Chard

Kale/Senposai

Cabbage

Summer Squash & Zucchini

Beets

New Potatoes

Cucumbers

Mesclun

Pick Your Own: Check out the MAP!

Flowers, Herbs-Summer Savory, Sage & Basil-Lemon, Sweet & Purple (light picking only)– we’re still just picking the tips

*Edible Marigolds* in the flower row there are some lovely tangerine gem marigolds- they are low growing, globe shaped plants with small bright orange flowers and very fragrant feathery foliage. Add the flowers to your salad for a tasty, beautiful accent.

Green beans- please let us help guide you as they are very floppy and remember that the amount allotted is what you will use in a week- this is not for canning, thank you.

  Farm news:

We have a new bull calf down in the pasture! He was born on the 24th just at sunset and, of course, when we weren’t looking. His momma, Cascade, is very proud of herself and is proving to be a great cow. He is healthy and can often be seen scampering around with the others. He is easy to spot, besides being the smallest one out there, he has a gorgeous, ¾ white belt around his middle. During the cooler parts of the day, the cattle are often hanging out eating in the middle of the floodplain pasture (just below the CSA garden fields) so they are easy to spot.

Featured vegetable-Summer Squash:.

I was serious when I said that we really like squash around here and I keep getting requests for alternative ways of cooking this versatile vegetable (I mean, how many other veggies lend themselves to Thai food one night, Italian the next and Indian the third?) We have six varieties of summer squash out there-yellow straightneck, yellow crookneck, zephyr (long yellow with a green bulb end where all the seeds are), green patty pan (also called Pattisson), yellow Sunburst patty pan and Flying Saucer Patty Pan (yellow and green striped). The Patty pans are similar to the other squashes in terms of sweetness and texture- but lend themselves especially to stuffing. We scoop out the seeds, hollow them out and stuff them with a combination of home-made breadcrumbs, cheeses, an egg, some bacon or sausage if we happen to have it thawed, fresh herbs and mushrooms. We top the whole thing with some homegrown paprika and a little more cheese and pop them in the oven for a half hour to an hour depending on their size, until the squash is tender. Delicious! The following recipe is a kid favorite and has a couple of optional additives to make them special.

 Recipe of the Week: Vegetable Pancakes/Latkes

Ingredients:

4 cups of grated, drained* vegetables (a combination of summer squash, zucchini and new potatoes works well and is delicious)

*by drained I mean that, before measuring, they should be grated and allowed to sit for five minutes or so and then have the excess moisture squeezed out of them.

2 eggs

1 ½ tsp salt

1tsp baking powder

6 Tbsp flour

Optional additions:

1/2 to 1 cup of Fresh chopped greens such as senposai, kale, swiss chard, or arugula

Handful of fresh minced herbs-basils, dill, or cilantro

½ cup of crumbled feta, ricotta salata or other grated cheese

Directions:

In a large bowl or stand alone mixer, thoroughly mix vegetables, add-ins and eggs. Add the flour, baking powder and salt and mix until just combined.

In a heavy skillet, heat a nice layer of oil until a drop of water sizzles. Drop batter by spoonful and flatten out. Flip when the edges turn golden brown. When both sides are nice and crisp, remove to a warm plate (with or without some paper towels to take up some of the extra oil). Serve hot with sour cream, applesauce, or  yogurt.

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

Garden CSA 2008                                                                          Week 7
Most of you have now had a chance to meet the chickens, since they are parked in their mobile house near the PYO garden and I would like to answer some of your many questions about them. They are almost all classified as ‘heritage’ breeds, which means they are from a varied and diverse background, and also that the breed has been around for more than fifty years, although many have been around for significantly longer. Many of the breeds are also classified as rare, endangered or recovering. We are making an effort to support the continued diversity of livestock in a global marketplace that expects uniformity of production, size & shape (i.e. all the same breed of cattle, hog & poultry). So, we have about eleven breeds of chicken so far- Red Stars (all reddish brown), Buff Rocks (golden), Auracanas (all colors, but most feral-looking with tufty cheek feathers), Rose-Comb Brown Leghorns( small and brown with salmon breast), Light Brahmas(black and white with feathered feet), Barred Rocks(barred black and white), White Wyandottes( white), Blue Andalusians( light to dark bluish gray), Black Minorcas(small & black), Speckled Sussex (dark brown with white spots), and Dark Cornish (black with gold lacing). Half of the birds are still too young to be laying- we’re looking at September for them to start.
A note about summer brassicas: We have been invaded! Well, by army worms & cabbage worms at least. You may find these guys hanging out in your broccoli, kale & cabbage. They just love them. We will probably spray with a bacteria that makes them choke up, but you may still find them. The best way to make sure that they don’t end up in your stir-fry (this is mostly for broccoli, chances are we’ve stripped them out of your cabbage)-just soak them for a few minutes in a little salted water before cooking, they will croak and fall to the bottom of the bowl. Give heads a little swishing in the water and then cook.

 

 What’s in your share (maybe)

 

Head Lettuce
Swiss Chard

Kale

Cabbage

Summer Squash & Zucchini

Beets

New Potatoes

Cucumbers

Broccoli

Pick Your Own: Check out the MAP!

The Peas are done!

Flowers- open for picking, please take a small bouquet and leave some for everyone to enjoy- thank you!

Herbs-Summer Savory, Sage & Basil-Lemon, Sweet & Purple (the Thai is too small!)- light picking only– we’re still just picking the tips

Green beans- you might get a handful this week, more next week, please let us help guide you as they are very floppy

 Featured vegetable-New Potatoes:.

 We hope that you enjoy these lovely tubers- they don’t get any sweeter than this. We have about ten varieties growing in the field for you to try- though some we will let get nice and big and harvest them at the end of the season as storage potatoes. A new potato is any kind of potato that has been harvested young and has not been ‘cured’ which means they have soft, very tender skins and will not hold for very long.  So eat them this week- or store them in the fridge otherwise they will go bad. Look for all shapes, sizes and colors including pink skin with gold flesh, all purple and all red. This week we have Red Norlands for you- white flesh with red skin.  

 

Recipe of the Week:  Solyanka

From the Moosewood Cookbook

This recipe was a staple for us in college and brings back fond memories everytime we eat it. Enjoy with a side of beets or sausage.

 Ingredients:

 4 medium potatoes (or about 2 lbs)

1 ½ cups cottage cheese

1 cup firm yogurt

1 Tbsp butter

2 cups chopped onion

¾ to 1 tsp salt

1 tsp caraway

1 small head of cabbage, shredded

2 med carrots

4-5 cloves garlic

1 Tbsp dill

 Lots of black pepper

Paprika & sunflower seeds

3 Tbsp cider vinegar

Directions: Preheat oven to 350. Lightly grease a 2 qt casserole dish. Scrub the potatoes cut them into small pieces and boil until tender. Drain and transfer to a large bowl. Mash the potatoes while still hot, adding cottage cheese and yogurt. Melt the butter in a large deep skillet. Add onions and salt and sauté for 5 min. Add caraway, cabbage and sauté for 10 min more, stirring occasionally and covering in between. When the cabbage is tender, add carrots, dill and garlic. Cook 5 min more and remove from heat. Add the vegetables and all remaining ingredients except toppings to the mashed potatoes. Mix well and spread into prepared pan. Sprinkle  on the toppings. Bake uncovered 35-45 min or until heated through and lightly browned on top. Serve hot.

 Garden CSA 2008                                                                          Week 5

 The farm is changing its name and we have a new logo in the works. We are changing the name since everyone is kind of tired of questions about Christmas trees and since we think of the farm’s name as being a reference to the brook flowing through the center of it, we decided to actually add that part back in and have the name really reflect our natural landscape focus.

Co-op Anyone?

So, who else is really sick of shopping at the grocery store? We are. We’re used to great co-ops and markets in the valley (you know, that area on the other side of the hill) and we just can’t get used to shopping in Pittsfield, Lenox or Great Barrington, but we also don’t want to drive to the valley either. So we are thinking that we would like to start a Buyers Club through Associated Buyers which will deliver to the farm. This company has a catalog of natural, organic and bulk products- they have a small minimum for delivery and most of their products are offered in a variety of sizes so that you don’t always have to buy a case of something (though this is oftentimes cheaper and as a group, we might be able to split cases and save some extra money). We would like to organize a meeting of those who might be interested in being a part of this. We would love to host this, but we also think that we really need help with the organization of it. There is a catalog in the distribution room for you to check out- please contact Des if you are interested and look for a meeting announcement in the near future.

 What’s in your share (maybe)

Head Lettuce

Swiss Chard

Kale- mixed

Scallions

Garlic Scapes

Mei Qing Bok Choy

Senposai Collards

Salad turnips

Cabbage

Pick Your Own: Check out the MAP!

Sugar Peas -the fifth row is now open, you may still find some in the first three.

Shell Peas– the fourth row- these are delicious, park the kids here while you hunt for flowers.

Strawberries – good luck.

Flowers- open for light picking, please be careful of the baby carrots that are in the rows next to them.

HerbsSummer Savory– light picking only

News from John & Peg: Coming Soon!

Farm Happenings:

Pork is available out of the freezer. We’re looking into having wild blueberries available for pre-order from the Benson Place in Heath starting at the end of this month. We love these berries- they use organic practices, but aren’t certified. Let us know if you are interested and how many pints/quarts you would like. Depending on how many folks are interested we might be able to get even more of a discount.

Featured vegetable– Kale:

Kale is a great all season vegetable- and we mean all season- it is one of the first available in the spring (especially if you are lucky enough to have it over-winter in the garden, like I did) and one of the last harvested in the winter. However, we often think of it only as a fall veggie- but it really is delicious anytime. We have four varieties for you this season- we’ve tried two so far- the standard, Winterbor or ‘regular green’ kale and Red Russian- a tender wide leaf with purple ribbing. You can sometimes find the latter in the store, but because it doesn’t keep as long or ship as far as the ‘Bors’ it is still a rarity. We also have a new variety that we are trialing (and it is proving to be somewhat of a slow grower, but may pick up in the cooler part of the season) called Redbor, which is similar in texture to its green parent, but has a spectacular dark purple color. We also have ‘dinosaur’ or Italian Lacinato kale- this kale has long thin, dark green leaves and is by far, my favorite. I love its soft texture and mild flavor. This variety is also perennial (which means it comes back every year from the same root) in the south. Here, it is a slow grower and we are having trouble with a couple of woodchucks who also think that it is delicious. We hope to have this one for you soon. The best way to eat any of the above is to lightly steam it (4-5 min) then sauté in olive oil with garlic and a dash of balsamic vinegar. Add it to your favorite soups!

Recipe of the Week:

Yep, you’re going to have to soak some beans overnight, but it is so worth it- the beans taste so much better this way. This is a great all-season recipe, cook beans in the crockpot in the summer and serve lukewarm- or heat up the kitchen in the winter by simmering on the stove all day. Excerpted from ‘Serving Up the Harvest’, (Storey).

Tuscan Kale with White Beans & Garlic (in the Crock-pot)

Ingredients:

1 cup dried white beans (Cannellini, Great Northern, or, why not, Hidatsa

6 cups water or good stock

1 onion, halved

2 sprigs fresh thyme

2 bay leaves

1 ½ pounds of kale, stems removed and leaves chopped

8 ounces smoked turkey or ham steak, diced (optional, but soooo good)

Salt and fresh ground pepper

3 Tbsp olive oil

4 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced

¼ tsp red pepper flakes (optional)

Directions:

Soak beans overnight or for at least 8 hours in plenty of water. Drain.

In a large saucepan, Dutch oven, or crock-pot set on low, combine the beans with water/stock, onion and herbs. Cover and bring to a boil, then simmer, partially covered until the beans are tender, approx. 1 ½ hours in pan, 4-6 hours in the crock-pot.

When beans are tender, remove the herbs & onion. (Beans can be refrigerated at this point for up to a day before continuing). Bring the beans & their liquid to boiling, add kale, salt & pepper to taste and simmer, stirring down the kale every few minutes until kale is tender, about 10 min. Stir in smoked meat if using. Meanwhile, heat oil in a small heavy skillet over very low heat. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant and soft, about 5 min. Do not brown. Mash the garlic with a fork & add hot pepper flakes, if using. Pour the hot oil over the beans & greens and serve.

 POTATO HARVEST THIS WEEK-END!!!! This Saturday afternoon at 1pm we will be harvesting the rest of the potatoes and we would love your help to get ‘em into bags. So come on down and help us get them in. The more the merrier and the lighter the loads…..Rain date is for the following Saturday, October 11th.

 What’s in your share (maybe)

Lettuce

Potatoes

Swiss Chard

Kale

Carrots

Onions

Shallots

Peppers/Eggplant

Mesclun

Leeks

Beets

Winter squashes

Farm news: Lamb for sale

Our neighbor raises a small amount of lamb on his small farm. He has a limited number of lambs that he is offering for sale. These are first come, first serve, so if you are interested talk to Des ASAP. Cuts include legs, chops, riblets & shanks, and ground.

Prices: $200/whole or $125/ half lamb

Whole lamb averages approx. 40 lbs of meat.

Featured vegetable–: Winter Squash

We have some lovely examples of these fabulous winter vegetables available this season. You’ve already tried the Delicata- which have a sweet, light yellow flesh and a thin skin that is edible. Our other offerings- Buttercups and Sunshine (a bright orange variant of Buttercup) both are meant for longer storage, have thicker skins and actually taste better after hanging out for a month or so. Sunshine is usually pretty tasty most of the time, but you should let the others ‘cure’ until Halloween or longer before eating.

Winter squashes store best at 55- 65 degrees and should be kept dry. You can even wipe them clean with a little vegetable oil on a cotton cloth to keep mildew/mold from forming on the outside.

We always prefer roasting these squashes to bring out the most of their nutty sweetness and to preserve their vitamins and minerals. Simply cut in half and turn cut side down on a cookie sheet with a little water in the pan. Roast at 375 until a fork easily punctures the skin and the flesh is tender. Serve with either olive oil and a little sea salt or butter & a tiny drizzle of maple syrup and a dash of cinnamon. Freeze any leftovers for use in soups or recipes like the one below or add to muffins or pancakes for special breakfasts.

Recipe of the Week: Chocolate Pumpkin Cake

From current Oct. 2008 Martha Stewart Living Magazine and is meant to be a part of some crazy creation with custard and ganache, but we thought it sounded just as delicious without all that. I don’t usually use dessert recipes, but I thought this one sounded tasty (without all the excess baggage).

Ingredients:

1 ¾ cup flour

1/3 cup plus 2 Tbsp unsweetened Dutch process cocoa plus a little more to dust the cake pans

1 ½ tsp baking powder

½ tsp baking soda

1 tsp coarse salt

1 cup of pureed winter squash

2 Tbsp vegetable oil

1/3 cup heavy cream

1 stick plus 2 Tbsp butter, softened plus more for the pans

1 1/3 cups sugar

2 large eggs

½ tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350. Butter 2 8″ cake pans, line the bottoms with parchment (butter) and dust with cocoa powder. Sift flour, cocoa powder, soda and salt in a large bowl. Whisk pumpkin, oil and cream in a medium bowl. Beat butter and sugar with a mixer until pale and fluffy. Add eggs, 1 at a time and then the vanilla. rEduce speed to low and add flour mixture in 3 additions alternating with pumpkin mixture starting and ending with flour. Divide batter between pans and spread evenly. Bake until testers come out clean 30-35 minutes. Let cool in pans on wire racks for 15 minutes. Invert cakes onto wire racks, remove parchment and let cool.

Serve garnished with your favorite topping- or pop a mix of roasted pumpkin seeds, almonds, a splash of cinnamon and touch of brown sugar in the food processor, whir to make a coarse topping that is simple but delicious….. enjoy!

Garden CSA 2008                                                                          Week 16

POTATO HARVEST THIS WEEK-END!!!! This Saturday afternoon at 1pm we will be harvesting the rest of the potatoes and we would love your help to get ‘em into bags. Hopefully the new ‘digger’ will function properly so that we don’t have to use shovels. So come on down and help us get them in. The more the merrier and the lighter the loads…..Rain date is for the following Saturday, October 4th.

 What’s in your share (maybe)

Potatoes

Swiss Chard

Kale

Carrots

Tomatoes (maybe)

Onions

Shallots

Brussel Sprouts

Peppers/Eggplant

Kohlrabi

Mesclun

Pick Your Own:

Flowers- still some out there,

Herbs-Marjoram, Thyme, Sage, Lavender and LOTS of Parsley

Cherry tomatoes & Sauce tomatoes- until frost kills ‘em

Chilis- in order from little greenhouse side: Czech black, purple; Jimmy Nardello; Serrano, red; Jalapeno; weird bells which are supposed to be there; Thai hots- should be red.

Featured vegetable–: Brussel Sprouts

Many of you may not immediately recognize this vegetable in its natural state. I know that the first time I saw the tall, bumpy stalk I was pretty shocked and it took a minute to realize that the bumps were the tiny cabbages we call brussel sprouts.

If you have never eaten fresh-from-the-stalk Brussels, it isn’t surprising if you aren’t all that fond of them. They tend to get tough and bitter once they are cut off the stalk and shipped across the country. Fresh Brussels are tender and sweet, and even sweeter after a good frost. They are cabbages, related to mustards, so they are supposed to have a strong cabbage flavor and are paired well with other strong flavors such as smoked meats, mustard and mellowed by cream. But you have to know how to cook them to perfection. Under no circumstances should they be boiled or steamed to death. This takes away all their sweetness, not to mention all the vitamins and minerals that make them so good for your body.

The simplest way to prepare them is to strip them off the stalk, sort by size and cut in half any larger ones so that they are similar to smaller buds. Place sprouts in a single layer in the bottom of a heavy, oven-proof skillet and add just a small amount of water and a good size Tbsp of butter. Steam sprouts until they are just tender (about 8 min) most of the water should be gone. At this point you can either throw them in a 350 degree oven and roast until nicely browned or you can pan roast on top of the stove. In either case, tossing in some chunks of garlic to roast with them is ideal. Serve garnished with parmesan cheese and you have a mouth-watering side dish that will have them begging for more.

 Recipe of the Week: Holiday Brussels with Pecans & Cranberries

 Sounds just dreamily delicious to us! From Serving up the Harvest, Storey Publishing

Ingredients:

1 ½ pounds Brussels

½ cup dried cranberries

2 Tbsp butter

1 cup pecans

2 shallots, minced

Directions: Steam the Brussels and cranberries over boiling water until sprouts are tender, but still crunchy. Transfer to a serving dish.

In the meantime, melt the butter in a small skillet over medium heat. Add the pecans and shallots and sauté until shallots are translucent and the pecans are fragrant- about 3 minutes.

Pour the butter and pecan mixture over the Brussels and toss gently and serve.

Just a note: I didn’t get it together to do a newletter for the 15th week!

Garden CSA 2008                                                                          Week 14

WINTER SQUASH HARVEST THIS WEEK-END!!!! This Saturday afternoon at 1pm we will be harvesting the bulk of the winter squash and we would love your help. (We had thought to be getting in the potatoes but we will wait until the end of the month for that- the digger needs a part first!) So come on down and help us harvest the squash. The more the merrier and the lighter the loads…..Rain date is for the following Saturday, the 20th.

What’s in your share (maybe)

Edamame

Potatoes

Swiss Chard

Kale

Summer Squash & Zucchini

Carrots

Tomatoes

Onions

Cucumbers

Peppers/Eggplant

Pick Your Own:

Flowers- still some out there, check out the asters.

Herbs-Summer Savory & Basil-Lemon, Sweet, Thai & Purple, Marjoram, Thyme, Sage, Lavender and LOTS of Parsley

Green beans-getting close to the end

Cherry tomatoes & Sauce tomatoes

Chilis- in order from little greenhouse side: Czech black, purple; Jimmy Nardello; Serrano, red; Jalapeno; weird bells which are supposed to be there; Thai hots- should be red.

Featured vegetable–: Carrots

Carrots were originally cultivated in Turkey, though we have a native carrot variety here in North America, and were not the orange that we see commonly, but were purple. I have grown and will grow again, this fabulous ‘Purple Dragon’ carrot that is an heirloom variety making a comeback to specialty markets and CSA’s.

There is nothing so beautiful as digging carrots out of the ground. Even though we’ve been doing it for years now, there is still something so satisfying about pushing through the green feathery leaves, breaking into the deep brown soil and emerging with a forkful of impossibly bright orange carrots. Add snow and it is even more sensational (though this has only happened to me a couple times).

I will let you in on a little secret- you may think that the carrots taste sweet right now and they do, especially compared to the yucky ones that come from California, but this is nothing. Wait for the first frost and those carrots will explode with impossible sweetness. The reason for this is that they need that first shock of cold weather to really gear up and start storing their sugars in the root. This is also why carrots from the West are never as good, no frost, no super sweet carrots. We’re lucky here in that we do have frost and the carrots are amazing. 

We are actually offering five different varieties of carrots. We’ve gone through the short earlies and are now into the longer, more storage type roots.  Don’t be surprised if you come across some deep red carrots- these are called Atomic Reds, an heirloom, and are really carroty and delicious.

Recipe of the Week: (not too) Spicy Corn/Carrot Quesadillas

My family loves these- you can vary the veggies, but the corn and carrots are a winning combo. This is adapted from Moosewood Cooks at Home (I think, it was made at a friends house 10 years ago and has been adapted and reinvented since)

Ingredients

4 small ears of corn, or about 2-3 cups

2-3 good fresh carrots, grated

1 small onion, chopped

1 clove of garlic, minced

1 jalapeno, green

1 packed cup of grated cheddar or Monterey jack cheese

4-6 large tortillas

Your favorite salsa and sour cream

Directions:

Cut the corn off the cob and scrape out milk. In a heavy skillet, sauté onion until soft and add the carrots. Saute briefly and add the corn and chili. Cook until veggies are tender but not mush and add the garlic. Turn off the heat and add the cheese. Stir until melted. Transfer mixture to a bowl and clean your skillet.

Heat the skillet again with a little oil. Meanwhile, put heaping spoonfuls of the mixture into one half of the large tortilla and fold over. Pan fry in the skillet, browning first one side then the other, adding more cheese if you wish. Repeat for rest of tortillas. Garnish with your favorite salsa, sour cream, or guacamole.

Garden CSA 2008                                                                          Week 13This month’s issue of the Barnyard Bull is now available on-line- check it out at www.holidayfarm.wordpress.com. Our friend Leigh took some gorgeous photos of the farm which we’ve highlighted in the current issue. The cattle are hanging out on the hill pasture- don’t be surprised if they stare at you while you are out picking in the PYO. They are very very curious about just what we are doing in there. While we are working on their handling, they are still pretty shy and will bolt if startled. They probably won’t let you pet them so please don’t go inside their fence.
What’s in your share (maybe)

Edamame

Potatoes

Swiss Chard

Kale

Summer Squash & Zucchini

Carrots

Tomatoes

Onions

Cucumbers

Peppers/Eggplant

 Pick Your Own:

Flowers & Herbs-Summer Savory & Basil-Lemon, Sweet, Thai & Purple

Green beans-getting close to the end

Cherry tomatoes & Sauce tomatoes

Chilis

POTATO HARVEST!

We are going to be harvesting our storage potato varieties on Saturday, September 13th at 1pm (rain date the following weekend) and we would love to have your help! More hands make this work go a lot faster. We will be using a tractor-pulled potato digger to get them out of the ground, but we need volunteers to help us pick them up. Come on out and enjoy the afternoon with us.

We decided to change this to Winter Squash Harvest since we think it is more crucial to get that in SOON!

Featured vegetable–: Edamame

Edamame or edible soybean is the bar food of Japan. We were turned on to it as an appetizer at our favorite Japanese restaurant down in Northampton and were thrilled that we could grow it with no problems (unless you count the groundhogs who love it more than broccoli). Our kids think it is the best and will eat it over just about any other vegetable. I can’t figure out if it is the de-shelling part that thrills them or the taste, it is equally satisfying for both reasons. I like to serve it up as a quick snack for the kids if dinner, especially at this time of year, is going to be a little late. It also makes a great addition to a lunch bag or to card games or movies in lieu of popcorn.  It is really good for you being chock full of protein, anti-oxidants and omega-3’s.

 Everyone asks me how I cook them and while I have never timed it (something around 5-7 minutes or so)- I simply plunk the whole pods into a pan and cover with water. Bring it to a boil and keep your eye on it as the pods turn bright green and then just begin to get a little olive colored- voila, they are done! Drain and sprinkle the pods with a little of your favorite sea salt (we are enjoying a lovely salt from the coast of Brittany) and serve. To eat: Nibble the beans out of the pods or put the whole pod in your mouth and pop the beans out with your teeth. Discard the pods. Put an empty bowl on the table for the pods.

Recipe of the Week: Curry Spiced Edamame

Ingredients

1 pound edamame in the shell

1 Tbsp coarse salt

1 tsp curry powder

1 tsp garlic powder

¼ tsp cayenne

Directions:

Prepare edamame pods as above. In a serving bowl, combine salt , curry, garlic and cayenne and mix well. Toss spice mixture with cooked pods and mix well. Serve at room temperature with an empty bowl for discarded pods.

Advertisements

One response

10 08 2008
CYNTHIA KADEL

WHAT HAPPENED TO WEEK 6 RECIPE? WAS IT THE ONE FOR BEETS WITH OJ? I AM DESPERATELY LOOKING FOR THAT RECIPE — CANNOT FIND IT ANYPLACE!! PLEASE HELP….THANKS, CK

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: